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Necrological Report 

PRESENTED TO THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF 

Princeton Theoloeigal Seminary, 


AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, 


MAY 9th, 1883. 



NECROLOGICAL REPORT 


PRESENTED TO THE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



/fiuolofittal 



AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING 


May gthf i88j. 


BY A COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATION. 


PHILADELPHIA: 

Grant, Faires & Rodgers, Printers, 52 & 54 North Sixth Street. 

1883. 


oonsrsTiTUTioasr 


OF THE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


OF 

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 


I. The name of this Association shall be The Alumni Association 
OF Princeton Seminary. 

II. All who have been students in the Seminary shall be regarded, 
if they please, as members of this Association. 

III. The object of the Association shall be the promotion of brotherly 
love among its members, and the advancement of the interests of the 
Seminary. 

IV. The Professors, Directors and Trustees of the Seminary shall be 
regarded as ex-officio members of this Association. 

V. The officers of the Association shall be a. President, a Vice- 
President, a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall be elected annually, 
and continued in office until others are chosen to succeed them. 

VI. The officers, with three other members, annually chosen, shall 
be an Executive Committee, with power to attend to the business of 
the Association in the interval of its meetings. 

VII. The Stated Meetings of the Association shall be held annually in 
Princeton on the same day with the closing exercises of the Seminary, 
at the close of. the Seminary year, at such hour as may be appointed 
from year to year. 

VUI. Special meetings of the Association shall be called by the 
President, on the written request of five members, notice thereof, and 
the object thereof, being given in two religious papers at least two 
weeks previous to its occurence. 


ANNUAL MEETING 


OF THE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF 

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 


Princeton, N. J., May g, i 88 j. 

The Alumni Association met at ii A. M., in the Seminary 
Chapel, the President, the Rev. Wm. P. Breed, D. D., occupying 
the chair, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. D. C. Lyon, 
of St. Paul, Minn. 

The minutes of last year were read and approved. The Consti- 
tution of the Association was also read. 

On motion of the Rev. W. H. Green, D. D., LL. D., it was 
resolved that the Association will adjourn at 4.45 P. M., without 
further motion. 

A committee consisting of the Rev. Joseph Beggs, D. D., the 
Rev. David Irvin'g, D. D., and the Rev. Matthew Newkirk, D. D., 
was appointed to nominate officers for the next year. They after- 
wards reported the following persons who were unanimously elected. 
[See the names on page 6]. 

The Rev. H. J. Van Dyke, D. D., reported the action of the 
Executive Committee and the arrangements made by it for the 
meeting of to-day. 

The Chairman of the Committee on Necrology presented its 
annual report, which was approved and ordered to be published 
under the direction of the committee. The Treasurer was directed 
to pay on the order of Dr. Breed, President of the Association, 
the bills for the preparation and publication of said report. A 
discussion was held in regard to the best means of raising the 
necessary money for this object in future years. The whole subject 

3 


4 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


was finally referred to the Executive Committee, and such of the 
alumni as incline to do so are invited to send contributions to the 
Treasurer, the Rev. Wm. Harris, at Princeton, N. J. 

The Treasurer, the Rev. Wm. Harris, made a brief statement 
in regard to the present condition of the Treasury and its need 
of funds. 

The following gentlemen, not alumni, who were present, were 
invited to sit as visitors, and take part in the discussions of the 
Association, viz: the Rev. J. M. Worrall, D. D., and the Rev. 

C. F. Deems, D. D., both of New York city ; the Rev. Henry M. 
Booth, D. D., of Englewood, N. J., the Rev. Wilson Phraner, 

D. D., of Sing Sing, N. Y., the Rev. Alfred Nevin, D. D., of 
Philadelphia, and the Rev. J. Voorhees, of Blawenburg, N. J. 

The Association then entered upon the discussion of the subject 
reported by the Executive Committee, viz: Evangelism — lay and 
clerical, which was opened with a paper from the Rev. John D. 
Wells, D. D., of Brooklyn, N. Y. Brief addresses followed from the 
Rev. James McCosh, D. D., LL. D., the Rev. Joseph Beggs, D. D., 
the Rev. Edwin H. Nevin, D. D. , Rev. Alfred Nevin, D. D., 
and others. 

The Association then took a recess until dinner. After dinner 
addresses were heard from the Rev. John Maclean, D. D., LL. D., 
ex-President of the College of New Jersey; the Rev. Ebenezer 
Erskine, D. D., of Newville, Pa., “ on behalf of the older alumni 
by the Rev. Henry J. Van Dyke, Jr., of New York city, “on 
behalf of the younger alumni by the Rev. E. Kempshall, D. D., 
of Elizabeth, N. J., “ on behalf of the Board of Directors; ’’ by 
the Rev. Matthew Newkirk, D. D., “on behalf of the Board of 
Trustees;’’ by the Rev. James C. Moffatt, D. D., “on behalf of 
the Faculty; ’’ and finally by the Rev. Wm. Irvin, D. D., of Troy, 
N. Y., who on behalf of a company of the alumni, presented to the 
Seminary a newly executed portrait of the Rev. Professor Caspar 
Wistar Hodge, D. D. 

The Association then adjourned. 


CONTENTS. 


This Report contains sketches of the following Alumni: 

Names. Page 

Adger, James 28 

Allen, Robert Welsh, D. D 39 

Annan, William, i / 

Atwater, Lyman Hotchkiss, D. D , LL. D 8 

Beatty, Charles Clinton, D. D., LL. D 10 

Birge, Ebenezer Cross 38 

Brown, Hope, 25 

Bullions, Alexander Blyth, D. D 44 

DuBois, Robert Patterson 34 

Foreman, John Preston, 49 

Green, Oliver Olmsby Maclean, 51 

Henderson, James Sebastian Hamilton, 42 

Hoes, John Cantine Farrell, D D., 29 

Hunt, Holloway Whitefield, 12 

Huntting, James Murdock 21 

James, Henry 36 

Jones, Samuel Beach, D. D., 30 

Langmuir, Gavin, 50 

Lyon, James Adair, D. D 31 

McLaren, John Finlay, D. D., 18 

Mercer, Alexander Gardiner, D. D., 43 

Milliken, Joseph ’ 47 

Morris, Robert Desha, D. D. 35 

Musgrave, George Washington, D. D., LL. D., 22 

Noble, William Francis Pringle, 45 

Pierce, John Davis, 13 

PiNNEY, John Brooke, LL. D., 25 

Sahler, Daniel Dubois, 46 

Smith, Edward Dunlop, D. D., 15 

Smith, James 9 

Stedman, James Owen, D. D. 33 

Stockton, John, D. D., 20 

Walker, Richard, 41 

Watson, Samuel Lytle 16 

Work, William Ramsay, 37 

Yates, William Black, 27 


5 


NOTICE. 


A Committee has been appointed by the Alumni Association to prepare a 
Necrological Report for the Annual Meeting of next year, which earnestly 
solicits the aid of all the alumni of the Seminary. When an alumnus dies, 
newspaper obituary notices, funeral or memorial sermons — and information in 
any shape — will be gratefully accepted. Let it be sent, as soon as possible 
after the death of the person to whom it relates, to 

WILLIAM E. SCIIENCK, Chairman, 

No. fjy4 Ckeslnut Street, 

Philadelphia. 


OFFICERS 

OF 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 

FOR THE YEAR 1883-4. 


Rev. Henry J. Van Dyke, D. D., President. 
“ Talbot W. Chambers, D. D., 

‘‘ William E. Schenck, D. D., Secretary. 
“ William Harris, Treasurer. 


Wm. Irvin, D. D., 

E. Kempshall, D. D., 
Thomas Murphy, D. D., 


Vice- President. 


} Additional Members 
of the 

F.xecutive Committee. 


COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY. 


Rev. William E. Schenck, D. D. 


6 


“ Wm. H. Roberts. 


Necrological Report. 

PRESENTED TO THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF PRINCETON THEOLOG 
ICAL SEMINARY AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, 

MAY 9, 1883. 


This Report contains notices of thirty-six Alumni who have 
recently died. Of these, the oldest were the Rev. James Smith, 
Class of 1817-18, who died at Moro, Madison Co., 111 ., in his 
90th year; the Rev. John Davis Pierce, of the Class of 1822-23, 
and the Rev. Hope Brown, of the Class of 1828-29, both of whom 
died in their 86th year. Of the 35 former students, eight died at 
an age beyond 80; eighteen beyond 70; twenty-nine beyond 60 ; 
thirty-one beyond 50; thirty-four beyond 40; and only one was 
under 40. The very remarkable average age of the 35 is 69? years. 
Of this number, some occupied prominent positions and wielded 
great influence in the Church; and of them all as a band, it may 
be said that they were good men and true, faithful servants of our 
Lord and Master. 

William Edward Schenck, 
William Henry Green, 

Henry Clay Cameron, 

Charles A. Aiken, 


7 


Committee on Necrology. 


8 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


I. 

LYMAN HOTCHKISS ATWATER, D. D., LL. D. 

A usagfe which needs no defence claims a place in these pages for 
Dr. Atwater, an ex ojjicio Alumnus of the Seminary, who has been 
since i860 a member, and since the death of Dr. MacDonald in 
1876, Vice-President of the Board of Trustees. 

The son of Lyman and Clarissa (Hotchkiss) Atwater of Cedar 
Hill, Hamden (now a part of New Haven), Conn., Dr. Atwater 
was born there, Feb. 23, 1813. At the age of 14, he entered Yale 
College as Freshman, and was graduated with the second honor at 
the Commencement in 1831. Although so young, he had already 
taken deep interest, and shown marked ability in those philosophical 
studies, in which as Theological Student, Pastor, College Professor 
and Author, he was to gain such eminence. The following year 
he entered the Theological Department at Yale, held a mathemati- 
cal tutorship in the College the last two years of his theological 
course, was licensed by the New Haven West Association in 1834, 
and at the end of his course in 1835, received and accepted a call 
to the old and important First Church in Fairfield, Conn., whose 
pastor he became by ordination and installation, July 29, 1835, 
and continued to be until his removal to Princeton, N. J., in 1854. 
In this relation he not only won and held a good name at home, 
but made himself known and felt more widely, especially by his 
theolflgical, philosophical and ecclesiastical ability and decision. 

At the age of 27 he made his first theological contribution, in 
1840, to the pages of the Princeton Review, to which he was to be 
for more than 40 years one of the most prolific, versatile and 
characteristic contributors. His articles, numbering more than 
100, would have filled more than three entire volumes of the old 
Review, of which he was for the last years of its existence, an 
editor. 

In 1854, Dr. Atwater was appointed to that Professorship of 
Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy in the College of New Jersey, 
which with some changes in its form and scope, he occupied with 
great usefulness and distinguished honor for the remainder of his 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


9 


life. An appointment to the Chair of Systematic I'heology at 
Allegheny in 1863, failed to move him from Princeton. He often 
rendered valuable service to the Church in Ecclesiastical bodies, 
both in his earlier and in his later connections, — notably in the 
Bushnell controversies in New England, and in the discussions and 
negotiations which preceded and culminated in Presbyterian Re- 
union in 1869. During the latter years of his life he had come to 
be recognized as one of the authorities of the country on economic 
and financial questions. What he was, more locally and personally 
to the College and the community in which his daily life was lived 
and his daily work done, as Professor, parishioner, citizen, friend, 
can be known only to those who have lived with him in these 
many-sided relations, in which the great philosopher, theologian 
and ecclesiastic do not always shine. 

The honorary degree of D. D. had been conferred upon him in 
1851 by the College of New Jersey, while he was still a country 
pastor; and to this his Alma Mater added in 1873 ^ Doctorate of 
Laws. 

For some years. Dr. Atwater had needed to take special precau- 
tions in respect to health. An attack of pneumonia in October 
last, aggravated and brought to an issue, deeply-seated affections 
of the kidneys and heart, and ended his useful life, Feb. 17, 1883, 
six days before the completion of his seventieth year. 

In October, 1835, Dr. Atwater was married to Susan (daughter 
of Elihu) Sanford, of New Haven, Conn., who died April 23, 
1879. Their children, three sons and a daughter, survived them. 


II. 

JAMES SMITH. 

James Smith, son of Hugh and Elizabeth (M’Cormick) Smith, 
was born near Newburg, Cumberland Co., Pa., June 12, 1793. 
He received his preparatory training at Hopewell Academy, near 
Newburg, under Mr. John Cooper. He united on profession with 
the Middle Spring Presbyterian Church, Presbytery of Carlisle, 
October 13, 1816, the Rev. John Moody, D. D. being then its 
pastor. He -was graduated from Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., 


lO 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


A. D. i8i6 ; entered Princeton Seminary in the summer of i8i8, 
where he remained until the summer of 1820. He was licensed 
by the Presbytery of Carlisle, April 12, 1820; spent two months 
in missionary work in Bradford Co., Pa. ; was stated supply, by 
appointment of the Presbytery of Carlisle, of the churches at 
Aughwick (now Shade Gap), McConnelsburg, and Tuscarora, until 
Sept. 27, 1825 ; was ordained by the Presbytery of Philadelphia, at 
Philadelphia, Nov. 15, 1825, and at the same time installed pastor of 
the Second Church of the Northern Liberties, in which he labored 
until 1833, when the church was merged in another organization. 
He resided in Philadelphia without charge from 1833 to 1864, 
when he removed to Monroe, Green Co., Wis. He remained, 
however, in connection with the Presbytery of Philadelphia until 
the Re-union, 1870, when his name dropped entirely out of the 
Minutes of the General Assembly. After the termination of his 
pastorate in Philadelphia, he preached very seldom, (a sliglit 
paralysis of the face having rendered public speaking difficult and 
unpleasant to him), and was for many years engaged in various 
secular pursuits. The last two years of his life were spent in trans- 
lating a volume of Turretin’s Sermons, with a view to its publication. 
He died at Moro, Madison Co., III., Dec. 3, 1882, in the nine- 
tieth year of his age, firm in the faith of the Gospel. He was 
never married. 


III. 

CHARLES CLINTON BEATTY, D. D., LL. D. 

Charles Clinton Beatty, the son of Erkuries and Susanna (Ewing) 
Beatty, was born near Princeton, N. J., January 4, 1800. His 
father was a distinguished officer in the Revolutionary war. His 
grandfather was the Rev. Charles Beatty, who succeeded the Rev. 
William Tennent as Pastor at Neshaminy, Pa. He received the 
name of Clinton from his grandmother, who was aunt to George 
Clinton, Governor of the State of New York and Vice-President 
of the United States. He pursued his studies preparatory for 
College under private tutors at Princeton ; he united on profession 
of his faith with the First Presbyterian Church of Princeton, N. J., 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. II 

September 12, 1817; was graduated from the College of New 
Jersey, A. D. 1818; spent one year in traveling and in teaching at 
Dayton, O. ; entered Princeton Seminary in 1819, passed through 
the full course and was regularly graduated in 1822. He was 
licensed by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, July 29, 1822; 
ordained as an Evangelist by the same Presbytery, October 2, 
1822; served as a home missionary in Indiana, Illinois and Ken- 
tucky in 1822 and 1823; was installed as Pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Steubenville, October i, 1823; released 
from its charge, April 4, 1837; was stated supply of the Second 
Church of Steubenville, from January 1838, to April 1844; was 
installed as its Pastor, April 15, 1844, and released from its charge, 
October 5, 1847; stated supply of Chestnut Ridge Church, 1848- 
50; stated supply of the Church of Centre, 1852-53; Principal of 
Young Ladies’ High School, Steubenville, O., from 1829 to 1879; 
Lecturer on “Practical Religion,” in the Western Theological 
Seminary, Allegheny, Pa., 1864-1873; Moderator of the Synod of 
Pittsburgh, 1839, of the Synod of Wheeling, 1842, of the Synod 
of Cleveland, 1871, and of the General Assembly in 1862. He 
received the degree of D. D. from Washington College in 1840, 
and of LL. D. from the same institution in i860. 

Dr. Beatty was an able and effective preacher and a faithful 
and ■ successful pastor. He was great in counsel and of rare 
executive ability. Even in temper, calm in reason, and far-seeing, 
he devised right things, and moved steadily, quietly, and perse- 
veringly to their accomplishment. In all the church courts with 
which he was connected, he wielded great influence and was uni- 
versally regarded as a safe and wise leader. He took an active part 
in bringing about the Re-union. He was a Vice-President of the 
great Union Convention in Philadelphia, in 1867, and was a mem- 
ber of the joint committee which prepared the terms of re-union. 

He will be held in lasting remembrance as a leader in education, 
especially that of females. In 1829 he founded the Ladies’ High 
School at Steubenville, where a very large number of young women 
have received their intellectual training, and where many of them 
have been brought to a saving knowledge of the truth. For fifty 
years he was the honored head of this institution, which still lives 
to bless the land and the world. 

From its beginning Dr. Beatty took a deep interest in the Wes- 
tern Theological Seminary, of which he was the most liberal 


12 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


benefactor. He was chiefly instrumental in bringing about the 
union between Jefferson and AVashington College. These institu- 
tions will preserve his memory longer than any monument that 
respect and affection may inscribe with his name. 

Of economical habits, he became, in the proper and useful pur- 
suit of his high calling, possessed of considerable means, which by 
wise and fortunate investments grew to a large fortune. Few 
ministers have ever had the ability and the disposition to give with 
such princely munificence to objects of Christian benevolence. 
Some years since. Dr. Beatty became almost totally blind, but after 
a skillful operation, he was able to see with a good deal of distinct- 
ness by the use of one eye. He was for some time in feeble health, 
but was able to preside as Moderator at the opening of the Meeting 
of the Synod of Ohio. On Friday, Oct. 27, he became suddenly ill, 
and from time to time passed through severe nervous convulsions, 
gradually sinking until his death, which occurred Oct. 30, 1882, 
in his eighty-third year. 

Dr. Beatty married — i. At Bridgeport, Bucks Co., Pa., June 30? 
1824, Miss Lydia R. Moore, daughter of Samuel Moore, M. D. 
She died June 28, 1825. 2. At Maysville, Ky., Nov. 6, 1827, 

Miss Hetty Elizabeth Davis, daughter of David Davis. She died 
July 15, 1876. 3. At Chicago, 111 ., Dec. 31, 1878, Mrs. Mary A. 

Crittenden, daughter of John Inskeep, of St. Clairsville, Ohio, and 
widow of Edmund W. Crittenden, M. D. She survived him. He 
had no children. 


IV. 

HOLLOWAY WHITEFIELD HUNT. 

Holloway Whitefield Hunt, son of the Rev. James Augustine 
and Ruth (Page) Hunt, was born at Ringwood, Hunterdon Co., 
N. J., March 31, 1800. He pursued his preparatory studies at 
Basking Ridge, N. J., under the tuition of the Rev. Robert Finley, 
D. D. ; united with the church at Harmony, Warren Co., N. J., 
on profession of his faith in the i6th year of his age ; was gradu- 
ated from the college of New Jersey, A. D. 1818; spent a year 
in teaching a classical school at Lancaster and Easton, Pa. ; then 
entered Princeton Seminary, and was regularly graduated thence in 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


^3 


1822; was licensed by the Presbytery of Newton, Oct. 2, 1822; 
was ordained by the same Presbytery, April 23, 1824; was installed 
as pastor of the West Galway Church, N. Y., Sept, i, 1824, and 
released, Aug. 31, 1825; was installed at Metuchen, N. J., April 
23, 1828; the pastoral relation was dissolved May 7, 1844, after 
sixteen years of faithful and successful labor, but he continued to 
supply the congregation about eighteen months longer. For nine 
years (1850-59) he preached to the Congregational Church at 
Patchogue, Long Island, and for six years (1860-66), was stated 
supply of the Presbyterian Church at Centreville, Orange Co., 
N. Y. The increasing infirmities of age then led him to retire 
from the active duties of the ministry. Still he continued to preach 
as opportunity offered. In all his fields of labor he acquitted him- 
self as an able and earnest preacher; a faithful and sympathising 
pastor, and a devoted Christian. The last years of his life were 
spent at Metuchen, N. J., among the people to whom he had given 
so many years of pastoral service. He died of apoplexy, due" to 
ossification of the arteries, after three days’ illness, April 28, 1882, 
in the eighty-third year of his age. He was a man of warm heart, 
gentle, humble, prayerful, and greatly beloved. 

Mr. Hunt married at Metuchen, N. J., Dec. 3, 1828, Henrietta 
Mundy, daughter of Ezra Mundy. She survived him. He left 
two sons and two daughters, and a grandson by a son deceased. 


V. 

JOHN DAVIS PIERCE. 

John Davis Pierce, son of Gad and Sarah Howe (Davis) Pierce, 
was born at Chesterfield, N. H., Feb. 18, 1797; received his 
preparatory education at Ward, Mass., under the tuition of the 
Rev. Enoch Pond, D.D. ; united on profession of his faith at the 
age of twenty with the Congregational Church at Paxton, Mass. ; 
was graduated from Brown University, R. L, in 1822; spent a 
year in teaching at Wrentham, Mass. ; entered Princeton Seminary; 
April 18, 1823; spent one year in that institution, and then 
studied for a year with Professor Park, of Brown University ; was 
licensed by the Worcester County Association, Mass., May, 1824; 


14 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


was ordained by the Oneida County Association, N. Y., Jan. lo, 
1825, and installed the same day, pastor of the Sangerfield Con- 
gregational Church, N. Y. ; was released from this charge in 1830, 
and then spent a year in teaching as Principal of an Academy in 
Goshen, Conn. In May 1831, he received an appointment as 
Home Missionary for Michigan, removed to Marshall, Mich., and 
continued to labor in that capacity until July 26, 1836. At the 
latter date, he was appointed Superintendent of Public Instruction 
for the State of Michigan, the first such officer in the United States, 
which office he held until 1841. He drew up a plan for the organi- 
zation of Primary Schools, also for the establishment of the State 
University, and also for the disposition of the University and 
Primary School lands. He was a member of the Legislature 1847 
and 1848, and introduced and carried through, in those sessions, 
the Homestead Exemption Law, since adopted in many of the 
states. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1850, 
and secured the adoption of the free school system in the Constitu- 
tion. He continued his residence at Marshall, preaching in the 
vicinity and superintending schools, until 1853, when he removed 
to Ypsilanti, where he remained until his death. He was acting 
pastor at Salem, Mich., 1856-62, at Wayne, 1863, and afterwards 
continued to labor in the ministry as he had opportunity. He died 
at Medford, Mass., at the residence of his daughter where he was 
visiting, April 5, 1882, of acute pericarditis, in the eighty-sixth 
year of his age. He was unconscious during his last hours, but 
previously his mind was clear, and he longed to be at rest. 

Mr. Pierce married, — i. At Holden, Mass., Feb. i, 1825, 
Millicent Esterbrook, daughter of James Esterbrook. She died 
Jan. 30, 1827. 2. At Madison, N. Y., Sept. 4, 1828, Mary Ann 

Cleaveland, daughter of Gen. Erastus Cleaveland. She died July 
24, 1832. 3. At Waterville, N. Y., March 13, 1833, Harriet B. 

Reed, daughter of Calvin Reed. She and one daughter (out of 
twelve children) survived him. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


15 


VI. 

EDWARD DUNLOP SMITH, D. D. 

Edward Dunlop Smith, son of Edward and Sarah (Maskell) 
Smith, was born Sept. 17, 1802, at Greenwich, Cumberland Co., 
N. J. ; received his preparatory education at Bensalem, Pa. ; 
united on profession of faith with the First Presbyterian Church 
of Princeton, N. J., Aug. 10, 1821, in his i8th year; was gradu- 
ated from the College of New Jersey, A. D. 1822 ; spent a year in 
the study of Hebrew in Philadelphia, where his family resided ; 
entered Princeton Seminary in 1823, where he spent three years, 
and was regularly graduated in 1826; was licensed by the Presby- 
tery of Philadelphia, Oct. 19, 1826; was employed as a Home 
Missionary in Georgia, 1828-29; Chaplain of the University of 
Virginia, 1830; ordained March 9, 1831, by the Presbytery of the 
District of Columbia, and installed the same day pastor of the 
Second Presbyterian Church of Washington, D. C., from which 
charge he was released, June 16, 1835 ; was installed pastor of the 
Eighth Church, New York, by the Presbytery of New York, July 
14, 1835; pastoral relation dissolved, Oct. ii, 1842; installed 
pastor of the Chelsea Church, New York, Nov. 27, 1842. He 
served this church until April 18, 1869, discharging the duties of 
a pastor with great earnestness and fidelity, and retiring from active 
duty after a ministry in his several charges of nearly forty years, 
with the undiminished confidence of his brethren and the affection 
of all the people whom he had served as a minister of Christ. He 
was a man of scholarly tastes and habits, a Christian gentleman in 
all his intercourse with men, and a faithful, sincere disciple of 
Christ. He died in New York City, March 28, 1883, in his eighty- 
first year. 

Dr. Smith married May ii, 1831, Jean Cary, of Carysbrooke* 
Virginia, who survived him. He left four sons and two daughters. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


l6 


VII. 

SAMUEL LYTLE WATSON. 

Samuel Lytle Watson, the son of David and Margaret (Adams) 
Watson, was born at Bethel, York County, S. C., February 5th, 
1798; was prepared for college principally under the tuition of 
John McKemie Wilson, D. D., Cabarras County, N. C.; was 
received to membership in the Rocky River Church, while at Dr. 
Wilson’s Academy, at the age of seventeen ; was graduated from 
South Carolina College in 1820; taught for two years to procure 
the means of continuing his studies ; entered Princeton Seminary 
in 1823, and was regularly graduated thence in 1826 ; was licensed 
by the Presbytery of South Carolina, November 17th, 1826; went 
immediately as a missionary to Alabama, then a new and thinly 
settled State, where he remained nearly a year, Montgomery being 
the chief place of his labor. He then returned and was ordained 
as an evangelist by the Presbytery of South Carolina, March 15, 
1828. In November of the same year, he became stated supply of 
the Steele Creek Church, Mecklenburg County, N. C., and was 
installed as its pastor by the Concord Presbytery, May 22, 1829. 
Here he labored with great success and to the satisfaction of the 
people, until March 13, 1840, when the pastoral relation was 
dissolved on his acceptance of a call from the Bethel Church, 
S. C., over which he was installed April 25, 1840. In this 
Church he labored as pastor for forty-two years, a fact that speaks 
volumes for the faithfulness and the devotion of the pastor and for 
the sincerity of the people in their attachment to God’s worship 
and the ambassador whom He sent to them. In September, 1882, 
he asked the Presbytery to dissolve the pastoral relation on account 
of the infirmities of age which rendered him unable to discharge 
its duties. But he still preached as opportunity occurred. His 
last sermon was on the third Sabbath before his death. He died 
November 13, 1882, in his eighty-fifth year. In his last hours 
he was calm and peaceful, fully sustained by the hopes of the 
gospel he had so long and faithfully preached. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


17 


Mr. Watson was a man of fine personal appearance, cheerful in 
conversation, with a voice full of melody in age as that of youth. 
Quiet and unostentatious in all that he did, scrupulously avoiding 
everything like display, he exerted a gentle, yet persistent and 
unfaltering influence for good, which only the registers of eternity 
can exhibit. Mr. Watson married, November 16, 1830, Nancy 
Hannah Neil, daughter of Col. Samuel Neil, of Mecklenburg 
County, N. C. She died suddenly, October 5, 1857. Two sons 
and two daughters survived him. 


VIII. 

WILLIAM ANNAN. 

William Annan, son of the Rev. Robert and Elizabeth (Haw- 
thorn) Annan, was born in the city of Baltimore, Md., April 18, 
1805 ; received his preparatory education at Gettysburgh, Pa., 
under the tuition of the Rev. Dr. Conaughty ; united at the age 
of fifteen on profession of faith with the First Presbyterian Church 
of Carlisle, Pa., then under the pastoral care of the Rev. George 
Duffield, D.D. ; was graduated from Dickinson College, A. D. 
1824; entered Princeton Seminary the same year, and having 
completed the full course was graduated in 1827 ; was licensed by 
the Presbytery of Baltimore June 21, 1827; was ordained as an 
evangelist by the same Presbytery, Oct. 8, 1829; was installed 
pastor of the churches of West Kishacoquillas and Little Valley, 
Pa. by the Presbytery of Huntingdon, Nov. 24, 1830 ; was 
released from that charge Oct. 30, 1835 ; was installed pastor of 
Sewickly Church, Westmoreland Co., Pa., by the Presbytery of 
Redstone, June 9, 1836, and released from the charge April 13, 
1838. He then removed to Pittsburgh, Pa., and became editor 
of the “ Presbyterian Advocate,’^ of which the “ Presbyterian 
Banner” is the continuance. This position he resigned in 1858, 
after having held it for seventeen years. 

Mr. Annan was a clear thinker, a diligent student, an attentive 
observer, a man of strong convictions, an instructive preacher and 
a forcible and pungent writer. He was the author of several 
volumes, which grew out of a part of his editorial work. These 
are, “Difficulties of Arminian Methodism “ Letters on Psalm. 


i8 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


ody;” “Doctrine of Close Communion, tested by Scripture and 
Reason;” “ High Church Episcopacy; its Characteristics, Origin 
and Results.” No where else can there be found within the same 
limits such thorough and pointed treatment of the subjects 
embraced in these volumes. 

For several years, owing to increasing infirmities, he lived for 
the most part in retirement, carefully watched over by a devoted 
daughter. During his last illness he conversed freely with reference 
to approaching death. To him death had no sting ; over him the 
grave had no victory. He died of senile atrophy, in Allegheny 
City, Pa., July 26, 1882, in his seventy-eighth year. 

Mr. Annan married at Mifflintown, Pa., April 19, 1831, Ann 
Eliza Hutchinson, daughter of the Rev. John Hutchinson, Pastor 
of Mifflintown and Lost Creek Churches. She died in Allegheny 
City, March 21, 1840. One son and one daughter survived him. 
Another son the Rev. John Annan, an able and promising young 
minister, died in 1870. 


IX. 

JOHN FINLAY M’LAREN, D. D. 

John Finlay M’Laren, son of Finlay and Margaret (Campbell) 
M’Laren, was born Feb. 7, 1803, at Maulius, Onondaga Co., N. Y.; 
was prepared for college at Cambridge, Washington Co., N. Y., 
chiefly under the tuition of the Rev. David Chassel, the Rev. 
Alexander Bullions, D. D., and the Rev. N. S. Prime, D. D. ; was 
graduated from Union College, July 24, 1825 ; spent a short interval 
in the study of law; was, at the age of twenty-two years, received to 
the communion of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church at 
Cambridge, N. Y., then under the care of his eldest brother, the 
Rev. Donald C. M’Laren; spent three successive winter-sessions 
in Princeton Seminary, beginning Nov., 1825, and ending April, 
1828, devoting the intervening summers to study, at home, with 
his brother; was licensed by the Associate Reformed Presbytery 
of Caledonia, N. Y., June 20, 1828, and at the request of the con- 
gregation, appointed stated supply of the Associate Reformed 
Church in Geneva, N. Y. ; was ordained and installed pastor of 
that church, by the same Presbytery, Jan. 7, 1830; was released 


• NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


19 


from this charge, April i, 1845; pastor of the Associate Re- 
formed Church at Hagerstown, Md., from April 10, 1845 to April 
I, 1846; and pastor of the First Associate Reformed Church of 
Pittsburgh, from April 5, 1846 to April 3, 1851. He received the 
degree of D. D. from Geneva College in 1847. 

In 1851 he transferred his connection from the Monongahela 
Presbytery of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church to the 
Allegheny Presbytery of what was then known as the “Old 
School” Presbyterian Church. He was agent of the Presbyterian 
Board of Domestic Missions for the Synods of Pittsburgh, Wheeling 
and Ohio, from September, 1851 to Nov., 1855; President of the 
Western University of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, Pa., from Nov., 
^855 to July, 1858, supplying the church of Pine Creek at the 
same time, and until Oct., 1862 ; Chaplain of the Tenth Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Reserves, from Sept. 4, 1862 to June 5, 1864, when 
the time of service of the regiment expired. Living in Detroit, 
Mich., he was stated supply in the churches of Plymouth, Nankin 
and Dearborn, successively from 1868 to 1874. 

During the later years of his life he resided at Princeton, N. J., 
where he died of paralysis of the heart, at the house of his son- 
in-law, the Rev. A. A. Hodge, D. D., March 14, 1883, in the 
eighty-first year of his age. 

Dr. M’Laren was an excellent scholar, a sound and well-read 
theologian, an instructive preacher, and a graceful and forcible 
writer. During his pastorate at Geneva he was for eleven years 
editor of the “Christian Magazine.” For many years he was 
a frequent and always welcome contributor to the press. He 
was an early and life-long advocate of every good cause, and 
ever ready to make sacrifice for their advancement. As a 
companion he was delightfully entertaining, as he abounded 
in knowledge and incidents, and his conversational powers were 
of a very high order. He won the attention of men and led many 
to the Redeemer. Thus busying himself with the work of his 
Master, a long life passed away, and closed in peace and in the 
blessed hope of immortality. 

Dr. M’Laren married, at Geneva, N. Y., Jan. 19, 1831, Mary 
Bull McKay. She died at Princeton, N. J., Jan. 31, 1879. Three 
sons and two daughters survived him — among the former, the Rev. 
William Edward M’Laren, D. D., Bishop of the Protestant 
^ Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Illinois. 


20 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. ' 


X. 

JOHN STOCKTON, D. D. 

John Stockton, son of Thomas and Sarah (Graham) Stockton, 
was born near Washington, Pa., November i8, 1803; was prepared 
for college at Washington, Pa., under the tuition of the Rev. John 
Reed ; was, on profession of his faith, received to the communion 
of the Washington Church at the age of eighteen years ; was grad- 
uated from Washington College October, 1820; was teacher of 
Latin in Washington College 1820-1822; pursued his theological 
studies at Washington under the direction of the Rev. Andrew 
Wylie, D. D., and the Rev. John Anderson, D. D., for three years, 
1822-1825 ; spent one year in Princeton Seminary, i825-’26; was 
licensed by the Presbytery of Washington April 20, 1825 ; was 
ordained and installed pastor of the Church of Cross Creek, Pa., by 
the same Presbytery June 20, 1827; was released from the respon- 
sible duties of the pastorate with the title of Pastor Emeritus June 
20, 1877, having completed a half century of active and useful 
service in the church. 

During the fifty years of his pastorate 1,545 were enrolled as 
members of the church, and forty ministers of the gospel and more 
than one hundred ruling elders were raised up. A year after his 
settlement at Cross Creek he founded a classical school, which was 
the means of extended usefulness. 

Dr. Stockton was an eminent Christian man, and his name will 
ever occupy a conspicuous place in the list of successful preachers 
and pastors in Western Pennsylvania. He was distinguished as a 
scholar, educator, theologian and presbyter. His preaching was 
earnest, scriptural, pungent, quickening Christians and arousing the 
impenitent. He was very animated in the pulpit, and wielded 
great influence in the community and in the church courts. His 
piety was not of the negative kind, but was a life in the soul, a 
principal that regulated all his actions, an embodiment of all the 
truths he so ably preached. 

A few weeks before his death he attended the funeral of the last 
survivor of those whose names were on the roll of membership at 
the beginning of his pastorate, and on that occasion he contracted 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


21 


f 

the cold which brought on his last illness. He came down to death 
in a manner altogether in harmony with the life which he lived in 
Christ, “like as a shock of corn cometh in its season.” He died 
of disease of the bladder, at Cross Creek, Pa., May 5, 1882, in the 
seventy-ninth year of his age. 

Dr. Stockton married, — i. Nancy Reed Clark, daughter of James 
Clark, of Franklin Co., Pa., May 3, 1836. She died September 18, 
1857. 2. Mrs. Elizabeth Glaaden, widow of George Glaaden, of 

Cannonsburgh, Pa., and daughter of Richard Johnson, of North 
Strabane, Washington, Pa., November 19, 1861. She survived 
him. He left three sons and one daughter — one son, a clergyman, 
the Rev. John P. Stockton, of West Unity, Williams Co., O. 


XI. 

JAMES MURDOCK HUNTTING. 

James Murdock Huntting, third son of John and Elizabeth (Strat- 
ton) Huntting, was born at East Hampton, Long Island, N. Y., 
August 5, 1798. Of Christian parentage, he was early instructed 
in the way of righteousness, and at about twenty years of age, united 
on profession of his faith with the Presbyterian Church in South- 
ampton, L. I. His earlier preparatory education was received in 
East Hampton Academy, his later in Southampton, under the Rev. 
John M. ^Babbitt, while at the same time he taught the village 
school. He was graduated from Yale College A. D. 1824, after 
which he taught for two years as principal of Clinton Academy in 
his native town. Leaving East Hampton, he served for a few 
months the Bible Society as a colportuer, canvassing a considerable 
part of Long Island. In 1826 he entered Princeton Seminary, 
where he remained nearly two years, leaving in 1828. He was 
licensed by the Presbytery of Long Island, April 16, 1828, and was 
ordained an Evangelist by the Presbytery of New Brunsvvick, June 
10, 1829, at Shrewsbury, N. J., at which place he labored as stated 
supply from August, 1828, until August, 1830. The next year, 
1830-31, was spent in New Jersey and on Long Island, in the ser- 
vice of the American Sunday-school Union. Having accepted a 
call to become pastor of the church at Westfield, N. J., he was 


22 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


installed there December 24, 1831, and served that church industri- 
ously, faithfully and successfully for eighteen years. From this 
pastorate, his only one, he was released October 18, 1849. Early 
in 1850 he removed to Jamaica, L. I., where he opened a boarding- 
school for boys, in which employment he continued until failing 
health compelled him to abandon it in 1867. Since that time he 
has lived at Jamaica in comfortable retirement. About the first 
week in May, 1882, he was attacked with a bronchial affection which 
confined him to his house only about a week. He died calmly and 
peacefully. May 14, 1882, in his eighty-fourth year. He was a 
faithful minister of the gospel while able to labor, and after that, 
in honorable retirement awaited in strong faith the coming of the 
Master whom he had delighted to serve. 

Mr. Huntting married October ii, 1831, Miss Catharine Ogden, 
daughter of Joseph and Hannah Ogden, of Elizabethtown, N. J., 
with whom he celebrated October ii, 1881, the fiftieth anniversary 
of his marriage. She survived him. He left two sons and two 
daughters. One of his sons. Rev. James M. Huntting, is a Prince- 
ton Seminary Alumnus. 


XII. 

GEO. WASHINGTON MUSGRAVE, D.D., LL. D. 

George Washington Musgrave, son of Joseph and Catharine 
(Schaumenkessel) Musgrave, was born in the city of PhiJadelphia, 
Oct. 19, 1804. His early scholastic education was received at the 
classical academy of the Rev. Samuel B. Wylie. D.D., where he 
was fitted to enter the junior class of the College of New Jersey. 
The condition of his health compelled him to forego the advantages 
of that institution, and he continued his studies privately. His 
parents were members of the Second Presbyterian Church, and he 
there enjoyed the pastoral care and catechetical instruction of the 
Rev. Ashbel Green, D.D. and the Rev. Jacob J. Janeway, D.D. 
After the death of his father, which took place when he was quite 
young, his mother united with the First Presbyterian Church of 
the Northern Liberties, then under the pastoral care of the Rev. 
James Patterson. He was received to the communion of this 
church on profession of his faith, when about seventeen years old. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


23 


He entered Princeton Seminary in 1826, and remained there for 
two years ; was licensed by the Presbytery of Baltimore, Nov. 5> 
1828, and engaged in mission work in the northeastern part of the 
city ; was ordained and installed pastor of the Third Presbyterian 
Church by the Presbytery of Baltimore, July 25, 1830, in which 
church he continued for twenty-two years, laboring with great 
ability, and gaining much influence in the city. 

Having received the appointment of Corresponding Secretary of 
the Presbyterian Board of Publication, he was released from his 
pastoral charge, Nov. i, 1852, and removed to the city of Philadel- 
phia. The next year, 1853, he was elected Corresponding Secretary 
of the Board of Domestic Missions, and remained at this post for 
eight years, until 1861, when he resigned in consequence of the 
partial failure of his eye sight. He then accepted an invitation to 
preach in North Penn (now North Tenth Street) Church of Phila- 
delphia, over which he was installed by the Central Presbytery of 
Philadelphia, Jan. n, 1863, and labored on with great energy and 
fidelity until released from the pastorate, Oct. 12, 1868, when he 
was the second time elected Corresponding Secretary of the Board 
of Domestic Missions. In this office he remained until 1871, when 
the Board was removed to the city of New York. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from the College of New Jersey in 
1845, "^25 elected a trustee of the college in 1859. The degree of 

Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by the University of Indiana 
in 1862. He was elected a Director of Princeton Seminary in 1837, 
and First Vice-President of the Board in 1868. He was Modera- 
tor of the Old School General Assembly that met at Albany in 
1868, and was also a member of the Assembly which met the next 
year in the city of New York, and was chosen Chairman of the 
Committee on Re-union. In November following he was appointed 
Chairman of the Joint Committee on “ Reconstruction,” and the 
plans and principles reported by him to the first re-united General 
Assembly, held in Philadelphia, May, 1870, for the management 
and adjustment of the Synods and Presbyteries, were adopted. 

After the reunion Dr. Musgrave confined himself and his efforts 
largely to the interests of the church in Philadelphia. He was a 
warm supporter of the schemes formed for the advancement of the 
church in the city, and gave his special attention to the establish- 
ment and enlargement of the Presbyterian Hospital, of whose Board 
of Trustees he was President from its organization until his death. 


24 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


He was also President of the Board of Trustees of the Presbyterian 
Historical Society from May, 1876, until his death. To the Board 
of Publication he rendered efficient service as a member of its 
Business Committee. One of the works of his closing years worthy 
to be recalled was his generous efforts to build up the Presbyterian 
Church in Bethlehem, Pa. He was wont to spend part of his 
summers in that town, and finding a struggling church there, he 
gave to it his wise counsels and contributed of his means to 
enlarge the church and its property, so that it soon acquired 
permanence, and became a recognized institution in the community. 
It was generous help given at the right time and in the right way. 

Dr. Musgrave was very frequently a member of the General 
Assembly. His first appearance in that body was in Philadelphia, in 
1831, less than a year after his ordination, and his last was in Buf- 
falo, N. Y. , in 1881, just half a century later. He was warmly 
greeted on every side, and made an address at the request of the 
body, recounting the progress of the church during the fifty years, 
and exhorting his brethren to fidelity to the standards of their 
church, and diligence and activity in the service of Christ. But at 
that time evidences of decline were painfully visible. His remain- 
ing months on earth were mostly passed in debility, sickness and 
suffering. During the following winter and spring he had a long- 
protracted illness; but he so far recovered that he was able during 
the summer to go out and even attend the meetings of some of the 
organizations with which he was connected. But soon his strength 
began to fail, and he declined slowly until the end came and he fell 
asleep. He had lived the life of faith, and his work being done, he 
“died in the faith,’’ August 24, 1882, in his seventy-eighth year. 

Dr. Musgrave was born to be a leader among men. Positive in 
his convictions, and with the ability to state all his opinions with 
marvellous clearness and force, he was in every assembly of men 
into which he came a man of mark. His power was soon felt and 
acknowledged. He was a man of warm attachments and strong 
convictions ; honest in his views and earnest in presenting them. 
No one ever was in any doubt in regard to where he stood on any 
question, especially when he had an opportunity to advocate or 
defend his position. He never married, and all his household 
went down to the grave before him. He loved with great and 
increasing affection the institutions at Princeton, and to them he 
bequeathed generous legacies. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


25 


XIII. 

HOPE BROWN. 

Hope Brown, the son of Elijah and Rhoda (Wheeler) Brown, 
was born at Concord, Mass., Feb. 16, 1798; pursued his prepara- 
tory .studies under the tuition of Prof. E. Snell at Amherst, Mass. ; 
was graduated from Amherst College, Mass., A. D. 1828; united 
on profession of his faith with the Third Presbyterian Church in 
Philadelphia, in the twenty-second year of his age ; entered Prince- 
ton Seminary in 1828 and spent two years there ; was licensed by the 
Worcester North Association (Congregational) at Princeton, Mass., 
Aug. 4, 1829; was ordained and installed pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church in Shirley, Mass., June 30, 1830, in which charge 
he remained until 1845 > removed to Napierville, 111 ., and was pastor 
of the Congregational Church there, from Oct. 15, 1845 *^0 
15, 1856; and was financial agent of Rockford Female Seminary, 
1856-1870. He then removed to Beloit, Wis., where he spent the 
rest of his days without charge. He died in full hope of the rest 
of the redeemed, at the house of his daughter, Mrs. M. S. Hin- 
man, at Beloit, Wis., Feb. 20, 1883, in his eighty-fifth year. 

Mr. Brown married at Fitchburg, Mass., April 12, 1831, Mary 
P. Fuller, daughter of Benjamin Fuller. Four daughters survived 
him. 


XIV. 

JOHN BROOKE PINNEY, LL. D. 

John Brooke Pinney, son of Elijah and Margaret (Langford) 
Pinney, was born in the city of Baltimore, Md., Dec. 25, 1806; 
received his preparatory education at Windsor, Conn. ; united on 
profession of his faith with the Presbyterian Church of Athens, 
Geo., when about twenty-one years of age; was graduated from 
the University of Georgia, August, 1828 ; studied law while 
pursuing his college course and was admitted to practice in 
the Supreme Court of Georgia, in 1828 ; taught one year in 


26 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


Waterboro, S. C. ; entered Princeton Seminary in 1829, and 
having completed the full course, was regularly graduated in 
1832; was licensed by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, April 25, 
1832; was ordained as an evangelist by the Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia, Oct. 12, 1832, having been appointed a Missionary to 
Africa by the Western Foreign Missionary Society; was appointed 
by the American Colonization Society “to act as Agent” of the 
American Colony at Liberia “until the arrival of a permanent 
Agent,” Oct. 24, 1833; appointed Agent, April 17, 1834. 

Mr. Pinney remained in Liberia until 1837. After his return, 
he was Corresponding Secretary of the Pennsylvania Coloni- 
zation Society, residing in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, from 1837 to 
1847; installed pastor of the .Presbyterian Church of Wash- 
ington, Pa., by the Presbytery of Washington, June i, 1847, 
released April 20, 1848 ; was Corresponding, Secretary of the New 
York State Colonization Society, from 1848 to 1863. In 1866 
he went to Nevada where he remained until 1869, engaged in 
mining and agricultural operations. A few years later, on the 
reorganization of the New York State Colonization Society, he was 
again appointed its Corresponding Secretary, and continued in that 
office until his death. He was a man of almost singular devotion to, 
his work, of indomitable energy of character, and indefatigable in 
labor. He had worn himself out long before his end came ; 
but in the intervals of his struggles with disease and infirmity, 
he continued to do his utmost to the last. His whole life was 
devoted to the negro race, and especially to African Colonization. 
Seven times he cro.ssed the ocean to Africa, once or twice after 
the failure of his health, to promote the interests of Liberia. He 
died of disease of the urinary organs, at his residence near Ocala, 
Florida, whither he had gone a few months before, on his seventy- 
seventh birth-day, Dec. 25, 1882. He was buried under the shade 
of the oaks near his house, six black men acting as pall-bearers. 

Dr. Pinney married at Guilford, Conn., Sept. 13, 1836, Ellen 
Agnes Seward, daughter of Amos Seward. She, with two sons 
and four daughters, all married, survived him. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


27 


XV. 

WILLIAM BLACK YATES. 

William Black Yates, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Ann (Seylor) 
Yates, was born in Charleston, S. C., Feb. 19, 1809. Four years 
of his early life were spent at school in Aberdeen, Scotland. Re- 
turning to Charleston, he spent about five years at a mechanical 
business. In 1828 an event occurred which changed the whole 
course of his life. In consequence of the existence of a malignant 
tumor, it became necessary to remove the greater portion of his 
left clavicle. The operation was performed by Dr. Valentine Mott, 
of New York, whose report of the case made it famous throughout 
the surgical world. “All the circumstances were candidly stated 
to the patient ; that the operation was without a precedent ; that it 
was impossible to say that the disease could be eradicated ; that if it 
could, it would be exceedingly difficult an'd dangerous. Neverthe- 
less, he resolved to submit to a doubtful remedy.” It was before 
the days of the use of anaesthetics, and for four hours and ten 
minutes, he underwent the terrible ordeal. The operation saved 
his life, and extended the fame of the already distinguished 
surgeon. 

During the long period of recovery, Mr. Yates gave his heart 
to the Saviour, and consecrated himself to the work of the 
ministry. He united on profession of his faith with the Scotch 
Presbyterian Church of Charleston, S. C., in 1829; spent a 
year in the Union Theological Seminary, Prince Edward, 
Virginia; entered Princeton Seminary in 1830, and remained 
there nearly one year; completed his theological course in the 
Columbia, S. C., Seminary, and was graduated thence with 
its first class; was licensed by the Charleston Union Presbytery, 
April 3, 1833; was stated supply of the First Church, in 
Charleston, S. C., during the absence of the pastor in Europe, 
in 1833 ; was ordained as an evangelist by the same Pres- 
bytery, Dec. 8, 1835, having been engaged for some months 
previous in labor among the seamen, to which his entire 
life was thenceforward devoted, as chaplain and pastor of the 
Seamen’s Bethel in Charleston. For this work he had special 


28 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


qualification. His frank, fearlesss, straight-forward character gave 
him instant power over the sailors, and nobly did he use it, never fail- 
ing to embrace an opportunity for their moral and religious welfare. 
The Seamen’s Bethel was made prosperous and flourishing, and the 
name of “Parson Yates,’’ as he was familiarly and affectionately 
called, was widely known and honored. His congregation often 
included some who would enter no other sanctuary. The rough 
sailor hushed the words of profanity in his presence, and blas- 
pheming lips learned to pray. For forty-six years, he gave himself 
with unwearied diligence to this work, until the weight of years 
and the pressure of disease compelled him to transfer it to other 
and younger hands. Then he waited patiently and trustfully for 
two years upon the threshold of that better life to which he finally 
passed. He died in the city of Charleston, S. C., July 19, 1882, 
in the seventy-fourth year of his age. 

Mr. Yates married in 1832, Mrs. Jane Taylor, widow of John C. 
Taylor of Columbia, S. C. Her maiden name was Wallace, and 
her father lived in Columbia, S. C. She and six children survived 
him. 


XVI. 

JAMES ADGER. 

James Adger, son of James and Sarah E. Adger, was born at 
Charleston, S. C., Aug. 22, 1812; pursued his preparatory studies 
in his native city; was graduated from Charleston College in 1831 ; 
entered Princeton Seminary the same year, and spent three years 
in study there, 1831-34; continued his studies at Andover 
Theological Seminary for another year, 1835-36; was licensed by 
the Charleston Union Presbytery Dec. 8, 1836, and was dismissed 
from that Presbytery, “ that he might connect himself with another 
body,’’ Dec. 23, 1839. He afterwards went abroad, spending 
some time in travel in Europe and the East. On his return, he 
engaged in mercantile pursuits. For many years he was unable 
to attend to any business. He died at Clifton Heights, near 
Philadelphia, Pa., June 28, 1882, in the seventieth year of his age. 
Mr. Adger never married. He was a brother of the Rev. Dr. 
Adger, and a brother-in-law of the late Rev. Thomas Smyth, D. D., 
of Charleston, S. C. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


29 


XVII. 

JOHN CANTINE FARRELL HOES, D. D. 

John Cantine Farrell Hoes, the son of Peter J. and Maria 
(Swart) Hoes, was born at Middleburgh, Schoharrie Co., N. Y., 
July 13, 181 1. His preparatory studies were pursued in the Kinder- 
hook Academy, Columbia Co., N. Y. While a student in this 
Academy he made a profession of his faith in Chaist and was 
received to the communion of the Reformed Protestant Dutch 
Church of Kinderhook. He was then about sixteen years of age, 
and he soon after decided to devote his life to the work of the 
gospel ministry. He was graduated from Amherst College in 1832 ; 
entered Princeton Seminary, and spent two years and a part of a 
third year in study there (1832-1834); was licensed by the Presbytery 
of New Brunswick September 16, 1834; was ordained and installed 
pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church of Chittenango, N. Y. by the 
Classis of Cayuga, April 22, 1836, from which he was released 
May 22, 1837 ; was installed pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church 
of Ithaca, N. Y., June 21 1837, and remained there performing the 
duties of his office with earnestness, vigor and success, for a period 
of eight years, until September 18, 1845, when he accepted a call 
from the Reformed Dutch Church of Kingston, N. Y., over which 
he was duly installed November 13, 1845. 

The ministry of Dr. Hoes in Kingston extended to January 7, 
1867, a period of more than twenty-one years, and abounded with 
signal tokens of success. Many were added to the church, the 
benevolent operations of the day were commended and sustained, 
the various interests of a large congregation were watched over and 
subserved, and the church continued to occupy a high position of 
influence and efficiency in the community. Besides the labors of 
his parish, he was much engaged in promoting the cause of educa- 
tion. A man of strong convictions, and tenacious in his defence 
of the right, he stamped the impress of his individuality upon all 
the public and religious movements with which he was connected, 
and his influence, healthful and far-reaching, will long be felt in 
the community. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred 
upon him by Union College, in 1852. 


3 ° 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


After the dissolution of the pastoral relation he continued to 
reside at Kingston, with no settled charge, but supplied several 
churches for short periods. His life was an honored, useful, and 
well-rounded one. His death was very unexpected, as he had been 
in excellent health until a very few days before the summons came. 
He died suddenly of rheumatism of the heart, at his residence in 
Kingston, N. Y., February 9, 1883, in the seventy-second year of 
his age. 

Dr. Hoes married, September 15, 1836, at Cortland Village, 
N. Y., Miss Lucy Maria Randall. She survived him. He left two 
daughters and a son — the Rev. Roswell Randall Hoes, an Alumnus 
of Princeton Seminary. 


XVIII. 

SAMUEL BEACH JONES, D.D. 

Samuel Beach Jones, son of Paul T., and Mary Lamboll (Beach) 
Jones, was born in Charleston, S. C., Nov. 23, 1811 ; was pre- 
pared for college at the Morristown Academy, N. J., under Messrs. 
Harvey Lindsley, David La Rue, and John Mab n ; united on 
profession with the College Church at New Haven, Conn., when 
about nineteen years of age ; was graduated from Yale College in 
1831 ; entered Princeton Seminary the following year, spent four 
years in study there (1832-36) and was regularly graduated; was 
licensed by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, Feb. 3, 1835 ; was 
ordained, sine titulo, by the same Presbytery, Oct. 4, 1837; was 
Assistant Secretary of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, 
1836-37; was installed Professor of Theology and Hebrew in 
Oakland College, Miss., Jan. 28, 1838 ; was installed pastor of 
the First Presbyterian Church in Bridgeton, N. J., May 9, 1839, 
and was released from that charge. May 10, 1863, after a faithful 
ministry of twenty-four years. He continued to preach in some 
of the neighboring churches until hindered by physical infirmities. 
From 1870 to 1875, he was stated supply of the church at Fairfield, 
N. J. For several years he was a confirmed invalid. 

His attachments to the Presbyterian Church were strong, and 
his proclamations of the gospel were faithful testimonies to its 
power and value in the salvation of men. His own faith rested 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


31 


securely upon the person and work of Christ. In that faith he 
lived and in that faith he died, at Bridgeton, N. J., March 19, 
1883, in the seventy-second year of his age. From 1847 to 1863 
he was a Director of Princeton Seminary. 

Dr, Jones married, June 19, 1838, at Burlington, N. J., Sarah 
Ralston Chester, eldest daughter of the late Rev. John Chester, 
D.D., of Albany, N. Y. She, with four sons and one daughter, 
survived him. 


XIX. 

JAMES ADAIR LYON, D. D. 

James Adair Lyon, son of Ezekiel and Mary (Adair) Lyon, was 
born near Jonesboro, Washington Co., Tenn., April 19, 1814. 
He was received to the communion of the Jonesboro Presbyterian 
Church, on profession of his faith, in 1831. He was educated at 
Washington College, Tenn., from which institution he was gradu- 
ated in 1832 ; went immediately to Princeton Seminary, and having 
spent four years in study there, was regularly graduated in 1836; 
was licensed by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, April 26, 1836 ; 
was ordained as an evangelist by the Presbytery of Holston, Sept. 
30, 1837 ; was stated supply of the churches of Rogersville and 
New Providence, Tenn., from Jan. i, 1837 to Jan. i, 1841. He 
then received a call to the Presbyterian Church at Columbus, 
Miss., and labored there as pastor elect, but without being installed, 
from Oct. 1841 to May 1847. Ihe following year he spent in 
foreign travel. On his return he accepted a call to the West- 
minster Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo., over which he was 
installed Nov. 15, 1848. He was released from this charge Dec. 
10, 1850, and established a Select High School for Young Ladies, 
in St. Louis, which he taught for three years until Oct. 1854, when 
after an absence of seven year he was again called to his old charge 
in Columbus, Miss., and installed Jan. 7, 1855. He continued in 
charge of this Church sixteen years (from 1854 to 1870) and was 
released Oct. 7, 1870 — having spent twenty-two years, in all,- of 
faithful work in that field. He received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from his Alma Mater, Washington College, Tenn., in 1854. 

In August 1870, he was elected Professor of Mental and • Moral 
Science in the University of Mississippi, at Oxford, Miss., which 


32 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


position he held for ten years, until June, i88i, when failing 
health compelled him to resign. 

Dr. Lyon was a prolific writer and published a good many ser- 
mons, addresses, pamphlets, etc. For several years he was a regular 
contributor to the Southern Presbyterian Quarterly Review. For 
many years he was widely known as a prominent actor in educa- 
tional and church affairs. In 1837-41 he was instrumental in the 
erection of a new Hall for his Alma Mater, Washington College, at 
an expense of $10,000. In 1854 he originated and carried into 
successful execution the enterprise of founding the City University 
in the city of St. Louis, Mo., under the exclusive control of the 
Presbyterians of the city, for which he collected subscriptions to 
the amount of $60,000. In i860 he succeeded in establishing the 
professorship of “ Natural Science in connection with Revealed 
Religion,” in the Columbia, S. C. Seminary, and prevailed upon 
the late Hon. John Perkins, Jr., a member of the church of which 
he was pastor at Columbus, Miss., to endow said professorship by 
the cash gift of $40,000. It is known as the “Perkins Professor- 
ship.” In 1863 he was Moderator of the Southern General 
Assembly at Columbia, S. C. He was repeatedly elected to im- 
portant positions in connection with educational and theological 
institutions, among them, to the Presidency of Washington Col- 
lege, in 1840, and to the chair of Didactic Theology, in the 
Theological Seminary at Danville, Ky., in 1873. 

Dr. Lyon was a man of superior intellect and it was the rule of 
his life to do whatever he did, in the best possible way. He was 
always clear in his convictions, firm and decided in his stand. He 
was esteemed and respected in every community in which he lived, 
and many warm and devoted friends will cherish his memory. His 
declining days were full of peace. Paralysis rendered him uncon- 
scious for the last four or five days. He died at Holly Springs, 
Miss., at the residence of his son-in-law, Eagleton M. Smith, Esq., 
May 15, 1882, in his sixty-ninth year. 

Dr. Lyon married at Jonesboro, Tenn., March 14, 1837, Miss 
Adelaide E Deadrick, daughter of David A. Deadrick of Knox- 
ville, Tenn. She, with three sons and three daughters, survived 
him. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


33 


XX. 

JAMES OWEN STEDMAN, D.D. 

James Owen Stedman, son of Elisha and Mary (Owen) Stedman, 
was born in Fayetteville, N. C., Oct. 31, 1811. His parents were 
faithful members of the Presbyterian Church, and early consecrated 
their son to God. He pursued his preparatory studies in the 
schools of his native place ; was received to the communion of the 
Fayetteville Presbyterian Church, on profession of his faith at the 
age of twenty-one years ; was graduated from the University of 
North Carolina, June, 1832; entered Princeton Seminary a few 
months after, where he remained four years (1832-36 ; was licensed 
by the Presbytery of Philadelphia, April 20, 1836; was stated 
supply to the First Church, Baltimore, Md , for six months, 1836; 
labored for some time in missionary work at Waynesboro, N. C. ; 
was ordained and installed pastor of the Church in Tuscumbia, 
Ala., by the Presbytery of North Alabama, Nov. i, 1837, in which 
charge he remained until 1845. From 1845 ^851 he was stated 

supply of the Church of Wilmington, N. C., when, his wife’s 
health failing, he removed to Philadelphia for medical treatment. 
During the years 1852 and 1853 he was stated supply of the First 
Church in Chester, Pa. While at Chester he received a call to the 
First Presbyterian Church of Memphis, Tenn. Before accepting 
it he went to Memphis and served the Church as stated supply, 
from May 10, 1854 until his installation, May 7, 1856. This rela- 
tion was dissolved July 2, 1868. It was while occupying this post 
that he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from La Grange 
Synodical College. 

In July, 1868, he organized the Alabama Street Presbyterian 
Church, in Memphis, and took charge of it as pastor elect. He 
never consented to be installed, but served the church faithfully, as 
stated supply, until April, 1880, when his failing health constrained 
him to retire from the active work of the ministry. He had 
repeatedly offered to give up the care of the church, but such was 
the devotion of its members that they would not consent to it until 
this time. 

As a preacher. Dr. Stedman was earnest, able, sound and effec- 


34 


NECROLOGICAI, REPORT. 


tive. He loved to preach the gospel at all times and in all places. 
The old, old story of Jesus and His love was ever new and ever 
refreshing to him. As a pastor, visiting from house to house, espe- 
cially when sickness and sorrow had entered the abodes of his 
people, his ministrations were abundant, welcome and effective. 
Dr. Stedman was a sufferer for several years, and at the last a very 
great sufferer. But he endured his sufferings as seeing Him who is 
invisible. He died from paralysis and added injuries from an acci- 
dental fall, in Memphis, Tenn., April 28, 1882, in the seventy- 
first year of his age. 

Dr. Stedman married, — i. In Philadelphia, Nov. 8, 1836, Miss 
Margaretta B. Harbert. She died at Chester, Pa., Aug. i, 1853. 
2. At Wilmington, Del., Jan. 3, 1855, Miss Mary A. Hayden. She 
survived him. He left three daughters and one son. 


XXI. 

ROBERT PATTERSON DU BOIS. 

Robert Patterson Du Bois, son of the Rev. Uriah Du Bois, and 
Mrs. Martha (Patterson) Du Bois, was born at Doylestown, Bucks 
County, Pa., August 19, 1805. His father tvas the founder and 
first pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Doylestown. He received 
his preparatory education at the Union Academy, Doylestown, Pa., 
under his father’s instruction, and his collegiate education in the 
University of Pennsylvania, from \vhich he was graduated July 29, 
1824. He spent two years in the study of medicine (1824-1826); 
w'as Principal of the Chester County Academy from 1826 to 1828, 
and Teacher in the Doylestown Academy from 1828 to 1834. , He 
was received to the communion of the Doylestown Presbyterian 
Church, on profession of his faith, in 1832, at the age of twenty- 
seven years. Having determined to enter the ministry, he spent one 
year (1834-1835) in Princeton Seminary, and about one year in 
theological study under his brother-in-law, the Rev. Silas M. 
Andrews, D. D., pastor of the Doylestowm Church. He was licensed 
by the Second Presbytery of Philadelphia (Synodical), October 8, 
1835. After a year spent in study, travelling and preaching, he 
began what proved to be his life work in the Presbyterian Church of 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


35 


New London, Chester County, Pa., November i, 1836. He was 
ordained and installed pastor of this church by the Presbytery of 
New Castle, December 20, 1836, and after forty years of faithful 
service, was released from the active and responsible charge of the 
congregation, with the well-earned title of Pastor Emeritus, 
November i, 1876. 

As a Presbyter, he was constant and conscientious in the 
discharge of his duties. Whatever he undertook he did well and 
thoroughly. For twenty-five years he was the Stated Clerk of the 
Presbytery of New Castle, and down to his latest days he was a 
diligent and trusted member, to whom important offices were readily 
given, as scrupulous in his attention to small things as to great, 
and neglecting no work or duty assigned him. As a preacher 
he was sound, evangelical and instructive. As a pastor, he was 
unwearied in devotion to his people. As a Christian he was earnest 
and exemplary. His piety shone in his face and illuminated his 
whole character. His goodness won all hearts. He dwelt in his 
old age among the people he had served in the ministry so many 
years. His home was established where his work was done, and 
he lies in the church-yard where he had seen so many of his flock 
buried. He died at his residence in New London, February 21, 
1883, in his seventy-eighth year. 

Mr. Du Bois married April 6, 1830, in Philadelphia, Miss Jane 
Haight Latta, eldest daughter of the Rev. John E. Latta, of New 
Castle, Del. She died May ii, 1853. Of seven children, one 
daughter and one son survived him. 


XXII. 

ROBERT DESHA MORRIS, D.D. 

Robert Desha Morris, son of Joseph and Mary (Overfield) 
Morris, was born in Washington, Mason Co., Ky., Aug. 22, 1814; 
pursued his preparatory studies at Bracken .\cademy, Augusta, Ky. ; 
was received to the communion of the Presbyterian Church in 
Augusta, Ky., on profe.ssion of his faith, when about eighteen years 
of age; was graduated from Augusta College, Ky., in 1834; entered 
Princeton Seminary the same year, and having spent four years in 
study there, was regularly graduated in 1838; was licensed by the 


36 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


Presbytery of Philadelphia, April 19, 1838; was ordained by the 
Second Presbytery of Philadelphia, Oct. 23, 1838, and was the 
same day installed Pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Newtown, 
Bucks Co., Pa. Here he spent a useful pastorate of eighteen years, 
teaching for most of the time in a parochial school, which he 
founded soon after his installation. For eighteen years he served 
as a Trustee of Lafayette College. He resigned his pastoral charge 
in Newtown, April 16, 1856, and removed to Ohio. In 1859 he 
became President of the Female College of Oxford, O., which 
office he held until his death. He was thenceforward known chiefly 
as an educator, to which profession he gave energetic and perse- 
vering labor, with abundant testimonies of the success of his work. 
He received the degree of D. D. from Centre College, Ky., in 
1870. 

For several years he was in feeble health. The last three 
months of his life he went out very little, but was conflned to his 
bed only about one week. Understanding well his situation, he 
had clear views of his acceptance through the merits and mediation 
of Christ. “Oh, religion is a glorious reality; I feel this more 
now than ever before.’’ “All my hope is in Christ, my precious 
Saviour.’’ “Oh ! the great, great salvation ! cling to it.’’ These 
and many like utterances of trust and triumph fell from his lips 
during the very last hour of his life. He died of Bright’s disease, 
Nov. 3, 1882, in the sixty-ninth year of his age. 

Dr. Morris was a man of high tone, warm in his friendships, a 
lover of good men and of the church of God, to which he gave the 
services of a loyal son and the best labors of his life. 

Dr. Morris married. May 3, 1842, in Philadelphia, Elizabeth N. 
Bevan, youngest daughter of Matthew L. Bevan, Esq., of Phila- 
delphia. She and four daughters survived him. 


XXIII. 

HENRY JAMES. 

Henry James was born at Albany, N. Y., June 3, 1811. His 
father, William James, was a Scotch-Irishman, well connected, and 
educated in his native country with a view to his entering the 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


37 


Presbyterian ministry. But preferring a business life, he came to 
this country, and settled in Albany, where he was greatly prospered 
and acquired a large fortune. 

His son Henry early showed great intellectual power. When 
twelve years old he lost a leg by an accident. He was graduated 
from Union College in 1830, and spent two years (1835-37) in 
study in Princeton Seminary, but he never entered the ministry. 

After leaving Princeton Seminary he went abroad, spending some 
years there, forming a friendship with a number of scholars and 
thinkers, Thomas Carlyle among the rest. During this tour in 
Europe, he became much interested in the teachings and doctrines 
of the Sandemanians, a sect which originally separated from the 
Church of Scotland. Later, Mr. James became an acknowledged 
follower of Swedenborg, with some divergence, and a champion of 
Socialism. He was a prolific writer on speculative and philo- 
sophic subjects, and published many books. 

For several years he lived in New York, but for the last sixteen 
years of his life he resided in Cambridge and Boston, Mass. He 
was an associate of Parker, Emerson, Alcott and Ripley, and closely 
identified with what is called the transcendental school of New 
England thought. Erratic in belief, he nevertheless led a pure 
and blameless life. His last appearance as an author was in the 
Atlantic Monthly oi May, 1881, in an article upon Carlyle. He 
died at his home in Boston, December 18, 1882, in his seventy- 
second year. 

Mr, James married in early life at Princeton, N. J., Miss Mary 
Robertson Welsh. One daughter and four sons survived him, of 
whom the eldest, William James, is Professor of Physiology in 
Harvard University, and the youngest, Henry James, Jr., is a 
well-known novelist. 


XXIV. 

WILLIAM RAMSAY WORK. 

William Ramsay Work, son of Andrew and Anna (Anderson) 
Work, was born in Lancaster Co., Pa., Oct. 10, 1810. He received 
his academical education at St. Clairsville, Belmont Co., Ohio; 
united on profession of faith with the Presbyterian Church in St. 


38 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


Clairsville, at the age of eighteen years ; was graduated from 
Washington College, Pa., in 1834; spent eighteen months as a 
teacher in the Academy at Lancaster, Pa. (1834-1835); studied 
for two years in Princeton Seminary (1835-1836), and one year in 
Allegheny Seminary (1837-8); was licensed by the Presbytery of 
New Castle, April 18, 1838; was ordained and installed pastor of 
the Presbyterian Church of White Clay Creek, Del., by the same 
Presbytery, Dec. 3, 1840; was installed also jointly over the 
Christiana Church, Dec. 22, 1845 > released from the pastoral 
charge of these churches, April 14, 1846. He then removed to 
Pottstown, Pa., where he founded the Cottage Seminary for Young 
Ladies, and was its principal, and the stated supply of the Potts- 
town Presbyterian Church, from 1848 to 1858. In 1858 he took 
up his residence in Philadelphia, and organized the congregation 
and built the Trinity Presbyterian Church, which he served as 
stated supply from 1858 to 1861. From 1861 to 1863, he was 
an agent for the Presbyterian Board of Publication. He then spent 
four years as agent for Lincoln University, and six years as agent 
for Howard University. For several years he was without a charge, 
but diligently engaged in various services for the church. His life 
was given to useful work, and his quiet, modest, gentle ways won 
the respect and affection of many with whom he met. During 
a long illness he suffered greatly, but waited patiently and peace- 
fully until his release came. He died of Bright’s disease, in a 
private ward of the Presbyterian Hospital, Philadelphia, Dec. 27, 
1882, in his seventy-third year. 

Mr. Work married, at Newark, Del., Aug. 24, 1844, Miss Mary 
Ann Macbeth, daughter of John Macbeth, of Newark, Del. He 
left two daughters. His wife died before him. 


XXV. 

EBENEZER CROSS BIRGE. 

Ebenezer Cross Birge, son of Elijah and Mary (Olds) Birge, 
was born at Underhill, Vt., June 5, 1810 ; united on profession of 
his faith with the First Congregational Church in Underhill at 
the age of sixteen years ; received his academical education at 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


39 


Jericho, Vt., and at Jacksonville, 111.; spent one ye.ar at Illinois 
College, and one year at South Hanover, College; studied Hebrew 
with the Rev. Mr. Kingsbury at Underhill, Vt.; spent one year in 
Princeton Seminary (1836-1837), and two years in Auburn 
Seminary and was graduated thence in 1839 ; was licensed by 
the North Western Congregational Association, in the spring of 
1839 ; was ordained and installed pastor at East Berkshire, Vt., by 
the same Association, Aug. 27, 1840, and released, Feb. 28, 1842 ; 
was pastor at Stockholm, N. Y.; after four years, he went to the 
west as a Home Missionary “ laboring where he was most needed.” 
From 1851 to 1855 he was stated supply of the Church in 
Wilmington, 111., and at Momence, 111. He labored at Burlington 
and Grafton, 111., 1855-56; at Algonquin, 111., 1856-61; at 
Hampden, Ohio, 1861-62 ; at Jericho, Vt., 1863-65. He resided 
at Underhill, Vt., 1866-1874, at Londonderry, Vt., 1874-1881, 
and after that date, at Chicago, 111., where he died. May 28, 1882, 
in his spventy -second year. 

Mr. Birge married at Jericho, Vt., Sept. 26, 1839, Miss Lydia 
Bacon Stebbings, daughter of Charles Stebbings, of Jericho, Vt. 
She, one son and five daughters survived him. 


XXVI. 

ROBERT WELCH ALLEN, D. D. 

Robert Welch Allen, son of James and Elizabeth (Logan) Allen, 
was born in Shelby Co., Ky., March 25, 181-7. the 

youngest of eleven children, five daughters and six sons, four of 
whom became Presbyterian ministers. At the age of fourteen years, 
he made a public profession of his faith in Christ, and was received 
to the communion of the Presbyterian Church at Waveland, Ind., 
to which place his parents had removed the year before. He 
received his academical education from home instruction, and in 
the preparatory department of Wabash College, Ind., and his col- 
legiate instruction in Wabash College, from which he was graduated 
in 1839. In November, 1839, he entered Princeton Seminary, 
with the intention of going through the full course, but his health 
failing, he was compelled to leave at the end of the second year. 


40 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT, 


He was licensed by the Presbytery of Crawfordsville, Ind., Aug. 15, 
1841, and ordained by the same Presbytery, Sept. 30, 1843, having 
spent the intervening time as stated supply of several churches. 
He was installed pastor of the churches of Jefferson and Frankford, 
Ind., June, 1844, and remained in that charge for nine years, until 
Sept., 1853, when the pastoral relation was dissolved. Receiving 
a call from the Pisgah Church, near Lexington, Ky., he entered 
that field and labored there with great acceptance until April, 1857, 
when he accepted a call to the Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville, 
111 . This pastorate he held for more than eleven years, until Sept., 
1868. He then spent a year (1868-1869) in missionary labor in 
the vicinity of Decatur, 111 ,; was stated supply of the Church of 
St. Charles, Mo., from Sept., 1869 to Dec., i8‘7o. Returning to 
Jacksonville, he supplied the churches of Union and Murrayville 
for two years, until the Union Church and a part of the Pisgah 
Church were organized into a new church called “ Unity,” over 
which he was installed Nov. 2, 1873. This relation continued 
until his death. 

Ill health attended Mr. Allen’s labors through his ministerial life, 
yet the Lord owned his service in such a manner that he did not 
run in vain nor labor in vain. Frequent revivals attended his 
efforts, and he was often called upon to aid his brethren in pro- 
tracted meetings. Having a fine personal presence, a dignified 
manner, and a clear, commanding voice, he seldom failed to pro- 
duce a deep impression. His mind was strong, vigorous and ana- 
lytic. As an expositor of divine truth he was especially clear, able 
and forcible, always holding forth the word of life, and presenting 
Christ crucified as the only hope of a perishing world. The 
honorary degree of D. D. was conferred upon him in 1881, by his 
Alma Mater, Wabash College, Ind., and also the same year by 
Centre College, Ky. 

During his last illness which was long and painful his mind was 
fixed upon the promises of God. At one time, near his end, he 
murmured, “ Dipped in the blood of the Lamb ; justified from all 
sin.” Thus grace was perfected in glory. He died of nervous 
prostration, at Jacksonville, 111 ., July 29, 1882, in, his sixty-sixth 
year. 

Dr. Allen married, April 6, 1846, in Frankford, Clinton Co., 
Ind., Miss Margaret Ann Maxwell, daughter of Col. Samuel Max- 
well. She, one son, and three daughters survived him. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


41 


XXVII. 

RICHARD WALKER. 

Richard Walker, son of Richard and Sarah (Henderson) Walker, 
was born in West Nantmeal Township, Chester Co., Pa., May i, 
1812. He learned the trade of a blacksmith, and practiced it 
until his thoughts were turned to the ministry. At the age of 
twenty years he was received on profession of his faith to the com- 
munion of the Presbyterian Church of Brandywine Manor, under 
the ministry of the Rev. J. N. C. Grier, D. D. He received his 
academical education at the Hopewell Academy, and then con- 
tinued his studies under the direction of the Rev. John M. Dickey, 
D. D., at Oxford, Pa., for about one year. He entered Princeton 
Seminary in 1839, and spent two years in study there; was licensed 
by the Third Presbytery of Philadelphia, April 8, 1841 ; was 
ordained by the same Presbytery at Bridgeton, N. J., April 21, 
1842; was stated supfily of the Womelsdorf Church, Pa., 1842; 
was installed pastor of the Allentown and Catasauqua Churches, Pa., 
May 31, 1844, and released, Jan. ii, 1859. He then went to 
Philadelphia, to take charge of a projected church on Tioga Street 
where he labored as stated supply for three years during which 
the Church was organized and a ehurch edifice erected for its 
accommodation. He then returned to Allentown, where he 
taught a private school for several years. In 1867 he labored 
in the mountains n^ar Alburtis, Pa., where over thirty souls 
were converted. These became the nucleus around which the 
Lock Ridge Church was afterwards formed. He continued to 
preach in Alburtis most of his time, and occasionally in other 
churches, until 1870, when he was invited to devote all his time 
to Lock Ridge. Under his ministry the church at Lock Ridge 
was organized and a house of worship erected For eight years 
he preached to that people every Sabbath, making, in all, ten years 
of service among them, with little pecuniary reward, but to the 
salvation of many souls. This was his last field of active labor. 
He was an earnest man, of thorough integrity and of fine Christian 
character. He died suddenly of paralysis of the heart, at his 
residence in Allentown, Pa., May 10, 1882, in his seventy-first year. 


42 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


Mr. Walker, married at Allentown, Pa., Dec. 7, 1843, 
Henrietta Caroline Zeller, daughter of the Rev. Daniel Zeller. 
She survived him. He left three sons and one daughter. 


XXVIII. 

JAMES SEBASTIAN HAMILTON HENDERSON. 

James Sebastian Hamilton Plenderson, son of James and Sarah 
(Graff) Henderson, was born in Frederic County, Md., Sept. 26, 
1816. He received his academical education under the instruc- 
tion of the Rev. John Mines. At the age of eighteen years he 
united on profession of his faith with the Rockville and Bethesda 
Church, Md. After spending two years in the Union Theological 
Seminary, N. Y., he entered Princeton Seminary, where he was 
regularly graduated in 1842. He Avas licensed by the Presbytery 
of New York, April ^2, 1841 ; was ordained as an evangelist, by 
the Presbytery of Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 17, 1841; was stated 
supply at Smyrna, Tenn., 1842-1843 ; stated supply at Augusta, 
Ky. , 1843-1852 ; was installed pastor of the Big Spring Church, 
at Newville, Pa., Nov. 18, 1852; Avas released from this charge, 
after ten years of faithful serA'ice, Oct. 8, 1862. He then removed 
to Middlebrook, Md., AA^here he spent more than a year Avithout 
charge. In 1864 he began .his ministry in the Neelsville Church, 
Md., in Avhich he labored Avith great success for eighteen years 
until his death. In this charge, as in all his others, he proved 
himself a faithful pastor and an able and earnest minister of the 
word. 

On Thursday, Aug. 17, 1882, AA'hile dressing, preparatory to 
fulfilling an engagement, he Avas suddenly seized Avith violent pain 
in the breast, which soon proved itself to be neuralgia of the heart, 
and despite the appliances of medical skill, it terminated in. death, 
after a few hours of intense suffering. He died the same day, Aug. 
17, 1882, in his sixty-seventh year. 

Although suddenly summoned from his labors on earth, he Avas 
not overtaken by surprise. He kncAv Avhom he had believed, and 
during the paroxysms of pain he realized the confident assurance of 
divine grace and support. His body Avas borne by the surviving 
members of the session to the cemetery adjoining the church. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


43 


attended by a great concourse of the loving people to whom he 
so long preached the precious gospel which he exemplified in a life 
of consistent Christian piety and usefulness. 

Mr. Henderson married in Neelsville, Montgomery Co., Md., 
Dec. 19, 1843, Miss Rosanna Jane Neel, daughter of Joseph Neel. 
She, with six sons and one daughter survived him. One of his 
sons, the Rev. John Robert Henderson of Lyons Farms, N. J., 
is an Alumnus of Princeton Seminary. 


XXIX. 

•ALEXANDER GARDINER MERCER, D. D. 

Alexander Gardiner Mercer, son of John and Jane (Hall) Mer- 
cer, was born in the city of Philadelphia, Jan. 4, 1817. He 
received his preparatory education at Elizabethtown, N. J., under 
the instruction of the Rev. Mr. Halsey ; was graduated from the 
College of New Jersey in 1837; was received at the age of twenty- 
five on profession of his faith to the communion of the Tenth Pres- 
byterian Church of Philadelphia, Rev. Henry A. Boardman, D.D., 
pastor; spent one year (1841-42) in theological study in Princeton 
Seminary ; became a candidate for orders in the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in 1845, ordained Dec. 13, 1846. His first 

charge was as Rector of St. John’s Church, Clifton, N. Y. In 
1853, he was elected professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy 
in the University of Pennsylvania. He was rector of Trinity 
Church, Newport, R. I., from 1855 to i86o; Assistant Minister of 
Trinity Church, Boston, Mass., on the Greene Foundation, 1860-61. 
Resigning this position he returned to Newport in 1862, where he 
remained until his death in charge of All Saints Chapel, which, 
according to the purpose for which it was built in 1848, was open 
only from June to October of each year for the accommodation of 
summer visitors at Newport. 

Dr. Mercer was a man of cultivated mind and great purity of 
character. He was naturally of a reserved, and retiring disposition, 
shrinking from contact with the world. In the society of his 
friends he was gentle and affectionate and full of sympathy. He 
died, Nov. 3d, 1882, in his sixty-sixth ye.ar. He never married. 


44 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


XXX. 

ALEXANDER BLYTH BULLIONS, D. D. 

Alexander Blyth Bullions, son of the Rev. Peter Bullions, D. D. 
and Mrs. Eliza (Blyth) Bullions, was born at Argyle, Washington 
Co., N. Y., May 13, 1822. He received his preparatory education 
in the Albany Academy, of which his father was the distinguished 
Principal. He was received to the communion of the Second 
Presbyterian Church in Albany, N. Y., at the age of twenty-two; 
was graduated from Union College in 1842 ; entered Princeton 
Seminary in 1842, and spent two years in study there ; was licensed 
by the Presbytery of New York, April 17, 1845 1 was ordained and 
installed pastor of the East Hampton Church, L. L, Nov. 5, 1846, 
and released, July 21, 1848; was installed pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church in Waterford, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1848, and released 
Jan. 28, 1853. He then spent three years (1853-1856) travelling 
in Europe and the Holy Land. After his return, he was elected 
Professor of Languages in Carroll College, Wisconsin, which office 
he held from Sept. 1858 to Sept. 1859; was engaged in the edi- 
torial department of The Presbyterian, Philadelphia, 1860-61 ; 
became stated supply of the Congregational Church at Sharon, 
Conn., Dec. 15, 1865, was installed pastor. May 28, 1868, and dis- 
missed May 27, 1879, after fourteen years of faithful service. His 
health being feeble, he then retired from the active work of the 
ministry and took up his residence at Lansingburgh, N. Y. 

In May, 1882. he was appointed by the Presbytery of Troy, a 
Commissioner to the General Assembly, which convened in Spring- 
field, 111., but before it met he was called to join the General 
Assembly of the Church of the First-born. He died very suddenly 
of disease of the heart at Lansingburgh, N. Y., May 16, 1882, in 
his sixty-first year. While engaged in writing a letter to his friend, 
the Rev. Duncan Kennedy, D. D., of Bloomfield, N. J., he was 
seized with a fit of coughing, and in a few minutes he was gone. 

Dr. Bullions was an accomplished scholar, a graceful writer, a 
genial friend, a faithful and devoted servant of his divine Master, 
an amiable, unostentatious, true-hearted Christian gentleman. 

Dr. Bullions married, — i. at Cambridge, N. Y., Nov. 13, 1846, 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


45 


Miss Margaret Shirland, daughter of John Shirland of Cambridge, 
N. Y. She died Dec. 15, 1847. 2. At Troy, N. Y., Aug. 25, 

1858, Miss Lucy J. Eddy, daughter of Titus Eddy, of Troy, N.Y. 
She survived him. He left two daughters. 


XXXI. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS, PRINGLE NOBLE. 

William Francis Pringle Noble, son of William and Susan 
(Chambert) Noble, was born in Lancaster Co., Pa., May 7, 1827 . 
was prepared for college under the tuition of the Rev. P. J. Timlow, 
at Gap, Pa., and the Rev. David M. Carter, at Strasburgh, Pa.; 
united on profession of his faith with the Upper Octorara 
Presbyterian Church at the age of eighteen ; was graduated 
from Lafayette College in 1847 > went immediately to Princeton 
Seminary and spent two years there (1847-49); was tutor in 
Lafayette College, 1849-50; spent another year in Princeton 
Seminary, 1850-51 ; was licensed by the Presbytery of New Castle, 
April, 1851 ; owing to the state of his health and his doubt as to 
his call to the ministry, his license was withdrawn at his own 
request, Oct. 1853; was engaged in secular work from 1853 to 
1857 ; was licensed by the Presbytery of Potosi, Jan. 1857, and 
ordained as an evangelist by the same Presbytery, April 1857. 
After supplying a number of churches for short periods, he was 
installed pastor of the Church in Belair, Md., Sept. 1858, and 
released, April i860; was stated supply at Upper Sandusky, O., 
1860-61 ; stated supply at Peningtonville, Pa., 1861-62; pastor at 
Upper West Nottingham, 1862-63 ; Chaplain U. S. A., 1863-65 ; 
stated supply at Coleraine, Pa., 1866-69; pastor at Peningtonville, 
Pa., 1869-72. From 1872 to 1876 he resided in Philadelphia and 
was engaged, so far as his health would permit, in literary work. In 
1877 he removed to California, hoping that his health which had 
been declining for some time, would be benefitted by the change 
of climate. He there supplied the Church at Los Angeles from 
April to October, 1877. He was afterwards stated supply at 
Passadena. But his health continned to decline, and there is little 
doubt that his mind was unsound during the last years of his life. 


46 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


He died of pulmonary consumption, at Passadena, Cal., Oct. 27, 
1882, in his fifty-sixth year. 

Mr. Noble married at Smyrna, Pa., July 16, 1862, Miss Sarah 
Jannette Easton, daughter of the Rev. William Easton, D. D. 
She, and two sons survived him. 


XXXII. 

DANIEL DU BOIS SAHLER. 

Daniel Du Bois Sahler, son of Abram Du Bois and Eliza (Has- 
brouck) Sahler, was born at Kingston, Ulster Co., N. Y., July 7, 
1829. He was received to the communion of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Kingston, on profession of his faith, when about 
thirteen years old ; was prepared for college at the Kingston Acad- 
emy and Woodbridge Hall ; was graduated from the College of 
New Jersey in 1853 ; entered Princeton Seminary the same year, 
and having completed the full course, was regularly graduated in 
1856 ; was licensed by the Presbytery of New York, April 1 1, 1855 ; 
was stated supply at Dunleith, 111 ., from Nov., 1856 to May, 1857 ; 
was ordained and installed pastor of the church at Redbank, N. J., 
by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, July 28, 1858, and was re- 
leased July 23, 1863; was installed pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Sheffield, Mass., May 17, 1864, and released Dec. 8, 
1869 ; was installed pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Carmel, 
N. Y., May 2, 1871, where he labored with great acceptance and 
usefulness until his death — a period of eleven and a half years. In 
June, 1882, he had a severe attack of pleuro-pneumonia and typho- 
malarial fever, which developed heart disease. His life was de- 
spaired of for weeks, but he rallied and gained sufficiently to go to 
New York City the first of October. He improved for a few weeks 
after going to the city, but was seized with his final attack of palpi- 
tation on Sunday, Nov. 5th. 

His physical sufferings were very great, but his mind was at 
peace. He often expressed the conviction that his end was near, 
and talked of his readiness to go — of the joys of heaven — the great 
glory that awaited him there — mingled with prayers for the forgive- 
ness of sin. In the midst of great agony he said, “My peace is 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


47 


wonderful, wonderful beyond expression.” His last words were, 
“Rest — rest.” So He giveth His beloved rest. He died of 
valvular disease of the heart, in New York City, Nov. ii, 1882, in 
his fifty-fourth year. 

Mr. Sahler was a man of fine culture, earnest in his work as a 
minister of Christ, and attractive to all who came under his influ- 
ence. It is among the mysteries of divine providence that one so 
fitted for his work, and seemingly so much needed, should be called 
from the church’s service. But the Master “doeth all things well,” 
and while He takes His servants to their reward. His gracious work 
in the world goes on. 

Mr. Sahler married, in New York, June 22, 1865, Miss Adeliza 
Frances Merriam, daughter of Benjamin Wheeler Merriam, of New 
York City. She with three daughters survived him. 


XXXIII. 

JOSEPH MILLIKEN. 

Joseph Milliken, the son of the Hon. John M. and Mary G. 
(Hough) Milliken, was born at Hamilton, O., Jan. 28, 1840 ; 
received his preparatory education at an academy in his native 
town, under the instruction of the Rev. Chauncey Giles, D. D. ; 
united on profession of faith with the Presbyterian Church at 
Oxford, O., when about sixteen years of age ; after spending one 
year at Hanover College, was graduated from Miami University, 
Ohio, in 1859 ; entered Princeton Seminary the same year, spent 
not quite one year in study there, and then went to Europe 
on a sailing vessel, for the benefit of his health ; visited Europe a 
second time in 1861 for the same purpose, where he remained for 
several months; was licensed by the Presbytery of Oxford Oct. 7, 
1862. In 1863 he again visited Europe for the double purpose of 
building up his health and of becoming thoroughly familiar with 
the French and German languages, and especially acquiring their 
right pronunciation. On his return he was variously employed 
in literary pursuits. He was ordained as an evangelist by the 
Presbytery of Oxford, April loth, 1867. In 1869 he was appointed 
Professor of Greek in Miami University. He also gave instruction 


48 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


in Hebrew. His continued iil health permitted him to retain this 
position only for one year. After another trip to southern Europe, 
he returned so much improved that he felt prepared to undertake 
the severe duties of Professor of the French, German and English 
Languages in the Ohio State University, then just established at 
Columbus. He labored there for eight years, from 1873 to 1881, 
with eminent ability and success, but with manifest injury to his 
health. In June, 1881, he felt constrained to abandon a work 
in which he felt so deep an interest, and strive if possible to build 
up his greatly impaired health. 

Mr. Milliken never was a pastor nor had any regular charge. 
He preached often at Hamilton, Ohio, and elsewhere, as his health 
permitted, but the condition of his throat prevented him from 
preaching regularly anywhere for any length of time. Owing to a 
change of doctrinal views, and at his own request, after he had 
freely, fully and frankly explained his position, his name Wds 
dropped from the roll of the Presbytery of Columbus Oct. 20, 1877, 
the Presbytery expressing its full confidence in his moral integrity 
and sincerity in the matter, and invoking in his behalf the influence 
of the Blessed Spirit of Truth that in due time he might be 
“ brought to what is for us our precious faith.” 

After resigning his professorship, Mr. Milliken went to Florida, 
where he remained until April, 1882. But his disease was too 
deeply seated to be removed, and his strength gradually but steadily 
yielded to its power. He died of consumption,- at the residence 
of his father, near Hamilton, O., Nov. ii, 1882, in his forty-second 
year. For years he had anticipated his end, and when it came, he 
was calm and resigned. His faith in Cnrist never failed him. To 
the very last he conversed freely and composedly of his approaching 
death. His manliness, his generous friendship, his rare training, 
and his admirable talents would have made his career, brief as it 
was, widely known and felt, but for the ill health that constantly 
kept him back. 

Mr. Milliken married in New York City, July 25, 1865, Miss 
Emily L. Brown, daughter of Samuel C. Brown, now of Trenton, 
N. J. She survived him. They had no children. 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


49 


XXXIV. 

JOHN PRESTON FOREMAN. 

John Preston Foreman, son of William and Susan (Parker) 
Foreman, was born in Ralls Co., Mo., Dec. i8, 1840; received 
his preparatory training at Van Rennsalaer Academy; was received 
to the communion of the Big Creek Presbyterian Church in his 
seventeenth year; was graduated from Westminster College, Mo., 
in 1861; entered Princeton Seminary in 1861, and having com- 
pleted the full course, was regularly graduated in 1864; was 
licensed by the Presbytery of Palmyra, Mo., May 13, 1863; and 
was ordained as an evangelist by the same Presbytery Aug. 27, 
1864. All his ministerial life was spent in Missouri. He was 
stated supply at Lick Creek, 1864-65; at Big Creek, 1865-68; at 
Ashley, 1868-69; at Glasgow, 1869-72; at Liberty, 1872-74. 
During the year 1875 compelled to suspend his ministerial 

work on account of illness, during which he was a great sufferer 
from acute physical pain. After severe surgical treatment he 
regained his health, and resumed the active duties of the ministry 
at Plattsburgh in 1876, where he labored with great efficiency and 
acceptance until disease compelled him to cease in March, 1882. 
Early in that year a malignant tumor began to develop itself, which 
a surgeon in St. Louis, whom he consulted in May, pronounced 
past remedial agencies. From that time he declined very rapidly. 
At first he suffered intensely. Towards the close his sufferings 
were not acute, but heavy and oppressive. To his lamenting wife 
he said, “God makes no mistakes.” Consciously approaching 
death, with full possession of his faculties, his brain never for a 
moment became clouded, nor did his mind rebel. The prospect 
before him was bright and glorious, and his end was peace. He 
died in Ralls County, Mo., at the residence of his sister, Mrs. 
McElroy, June 10, 1882, in his forty-second year. He was an 
earnest Christian, an able, acceptable preacher, a good man, 
universally respected and beloved. 

Mr. Foreman married, — i. In Ralls County, Mo., Oct. 20, 1864, 
Miss Virginia N. Woods, daughter of Samuel C. Woods, of Glasgow, 
Mo. She died March 2, 1875. 2. Near Liberty, Mo., Aug. 5, 

1879, ^rs. Mattie C. Hodges, of Clay Co., Mo., and daughter of 
James A. Griffith. She and three sons by his first wife survived him. 


5 ° 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 


XXXV. 

GAVIN LANGMUIR. 

Gavin Langmuir, son of Alexander and Jane (Woodburn) Lang- 
muir, was born at Kilmarnock, Scotland, Nov. i, 1840; received 
his preparatory education at Genesee Academy, Livingston Co., 
N. Y., under the instruction of the Rev. James Nichols; was 
received on profession of his faith to the communion of the Third 
Presbyterian Church of Rochester, N. Y., at the age of twenty 
years; was graduated from Williams College, Mass., in 1861 ; after 
an interval of two years spent in the settlement of his father’s busi- 
ness affairs and in recruiting his health, entered Princeton Seminary 
in 1863, and having completed the full course of study, was 
graduated in 1866; was licensed by the Presbytery of Rochester 
City, July 10, 1865 ; was ordained and installed pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Morristown by the Presbytery of Newark, 
May 22, 1866; and was released from the pastoral charge in con- 
sequence of ill health in the spring of 1868. . He then went abroad, 
and spent the rest of his life in various places in Europe. He 
continued in delicate health from the time he gave up his charge 
in Morristown. He loved the work of the ministry, and it was a 
great trial for him to be laid aside from it. For several years he 
was unfit for pastoral duties, but having gained a little strength, he 
accepted a call to the American Union Chapel in Rome, Italy, 
in the autumn of 1874. There he remained for two winters, 
^875-76. In the autumn of 1876, he became the chaplain of 
the American Union Chapel in Florence, Italy, where he labored 
for five winters (1876-1881) with encouraging success. In the 
spring of 1881, his health quite gave out, and he, with great 
reluctance, relinquished his charge. The following year he spent 
in Switzerland. There he grew more and more feeble, and it was 
with great difficulty that he made the journey back to Florence, 
which he called his home. There he had many warm friends, 
who were assiduous in their attentions to him during the few remain- 
ing days of his life. His last words were, “I believe, and I know 
whom I believe.” He died of consumption, at Florence, Italy, 
Oct. 16, 1882, in his forty-second year. He was a man of superior 


NECROLOGICAL REPORT, 


5 ^ 


intellect, rare culture and generous impulses. His Christian char- 
acter was earnest and decided. 

Mr. Langmuir married, at Paris, France, Sept. 3, 1868, Miss 
Laura Janet Baker, daughter of Cornelius Baker, of Elizabeth, 
N. J. She died at Paris, France, Feb. 22, 1872. He left no 
children. One had died before him. 


XXXVI. 

OLIVER OLSMBY MACLEAN GREEN. 

Oliver Olmsby Maclean Green, son of John Thompson and 
Bathsheba (M’Cune) Green, was born at Centreville, Cumberland 
Co., Pa., June 22, 1845 ! received his academical education at 
Shippensburg, Pa., and at Chambersburg, Pa. ; was received, on 
profession of his faith, to the communion of the Second Presby- 
terian Church of Princeton, N. J. ; was graduated from the College 
of New Jersey in 1867 ; spent two years in theological study in 
Princeton Seminary, t 867-69 ; was licensed by the Carlisle Presby- 
tery June 15, 1868 ; was stated supply of the churches of Rockville 
and Oliphant, Luzerne Co., Pa., from November to July, 1871 ; 
spent a year in study in Columbia Seminary, S. C., where he was 
graduated in 1872 ; was ordained as an evangelist by the Carlisle 
Presbytery, Oct. 4, 1872 ; was stated supply of the First Church of 
Alexandria, Va., from Nov.. 1872, to May, 1873. 

Having devoted himself to the foreign Mission work, he left 
home for Japan Oct. 15, 1873. As soon as he reached his field, 
he set himself with all the ardor of his nature to the work before 
him. He spent one year in Yokohama, studying the language and 
teaching. In a surprisingly short time he was able to preach to 
the natives in their own tongue. He was then sent to Tokio, 
where he remained nearly six years, giving himself with great zeal 
and energy to his work until his M’orking days were ended. His 
constitution, never robust, gave way under labor and exposure, 
and in the autumn of 1880 he came home to die. His disease was 
rheumatism, producing paralysis of his left side, and general 
nervous prostration. During all his painful illne.ss he never mur- 
mured. While there was any hope of recovery, he often expressed 


52 


XECROLOOICAL REPORT. 


the desire to go back to Japan and preach to the heathen, as he was 
now master of their language, which it would take a new man a 
long time to acquire. But when it became evident that this could 
not be, he patiently submitted to the will of his Heavenly Father. 
When asked if his faith sustained him in his dark hours, he 
replied, “Oh, yes; the Holy Spirit is truly my Comforter, 
strengthening my faith by bringing to my mind the words of 
Jesus and all the precious promises. Oh, blessed words of truth.” 
His death, though looked for, came unexpectedly at last. He 
rose from his bed without help, and sat on a chair to take his 
breakfast. He ate a little, then placing his arm upon the table, he 
laid his head upon it. His nurse, thinking it strange, spoke to him, 
and receiving no answer, lifted him into bed. He spoke no more, 
and in a moment he was gone — a blessed translation to the rest 
beyond. He died at his father’s house in Dickinson, Cumberland 
Co., Ohio, Xov. 17, 1882, in his thirty-eighth year. He never 
married. 

Mr. Green possessed natural gifts of a high order. From his 
early youth his life was that of a devoted Christian. Beloved by 
his associates, and trusted by the natives of the “Sunrise Empire,” 
to whose evangelization he had devoted himself, it seemed as 
though he could not be spared ; but God’s thoughts are not as our 
thoughts. There was other and higher work for him to do, and 
he has pa.ssed from this world of shadows into the clear light of the 
better land. 



May, i 88 j. 


The Alumni Association of Princeton 
Theological Seminary, at its meeting. May 9th, 
1883, took into consideration the subject of raising 
funds to defray its current expenses, including the 
preparation and publication of its Necrological 
Report. The whole subject was referred to the 
Executive Committee. 

The undersigned, as the Executive Committee, 
would therefore request that those who are willing 
to give such aid would send the sum of One 
Dollar or more, to the Rev. William Harris, 
( Treasurer of the Association), Princeton, N. J., as 
soon as practicable. 

HENRY I. VAN DYKE, President. 

TALBOT W. CHAMBP^RS, Vice-President. 

W. E. SCHENCK, Secretary. 

WILLLA.M HARRIS, Treasurer. 

WILLIAM IRVIN. 

E. KEMPSHALL. 

THOMAS MURPHY.